Petrie, William M. Flinders [Oth.]
The royal tombs of the first dynasty (Part I): 1900 — London, 1900

Page: 33
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/petrie1900bd1/0042
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THE OBJECTS DISCOVERED.

33

ushabti to be buried here, often accompanied by
bronze models of yokes and baskets and hoes,
for the ushabti to work with in the kingdom of
Osiris. The finest of these ushabtis were three
of Heqreshu, from whom we named the hill;
one is of white marble, exquisitely wrought,
another of solid blue glass, both banded with
gold-foil, a third of ebony ; the bronze baskets
with these were incised with the name. All

these are now in Cairo. The most important
after these was one in solid bronze, of a royal
scribe Any, probably the person whose great
papyrus is in the British Museum. All of these
ushabtis will be published with the later
historical things next year. A limestone base
of a figure covered with adorations roughly
incised was also found here. The whole hillock
is strewn with pieces of broken offering jars.



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