Instytut Historii Sztuki <Posen> [Editor]
Artium Quaestiones — 10.2000

Page: 94
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/artium_quaestiones2000/0096
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KEVIN E. KANDT

35. Andréas Schlüter and Giovanni Simonetti. Minerva Battling the Giants, (after 1704).
Stadtschloss, Berlin. (Destroyed)

the Battle ofthe Giants (c.1700) preserved in Berlin and ultimately deter-
mined the hall’s final décorative program.139 (Fig. 38)

In the same palace’s Erste Paradekammern, designed by Schlüter begin-
ning c. 1699, is the so-called Drap d’Or Kammern; the fïrst chamber in
these suites. It has ceiling reliefs with allegorical représentations of
Prussian kingship including “Rébellion” shown as a falling muscular youth
being subjugated by Minerva,140 similar to those found in the Great

139 The 496x360 mm gray-brown pen-and-ink drawing (Hdz 5800), Kupferstich-Ka-
binet - Berlin, utilizes sorne Roman characteristics in the coffers, rosettes, and trophies,
but the figurai disposition and frame recall the Le Pautre design. In: E. Berckenhagen,
Barock in Deutschland: Residenzen, Berlin 1966, pp. 90-91. An association with the Ter-
westen drawing and Schlüter’s designs seems conceivable yet remains uncertain. See:
L. Wiesinger, “Berliner Maler um 1700 und die Gründung der Akademie der Künste,” in
Berlin und die Antike, pp. 84-86. An interesting 18th century print by Antonio Baratti
(1724-87) entitled Superbia (and with accompanying verses) done after the Venetian
painter, Vincezno Scozia, depicts a similar composition with falling figures based on this
moralizing theme of downfall caused by excessive pride.

140 Peschken and Klünner, Das Berliner Schloss, p. 463, 474.
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