Blomfield, Reginald Theodore ; Thomas, Francis Inigo [Ill.]
The formal garden in England — London, 1892

Page: 125
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/blomfield1892/0157
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CHAPTER VI

KNOTS, PARTERRES, GRASS-WORK,
MOUNTS, BOWLING-GREENS, THEATRES

The ordinary modern flower-bed is ugly in form
and monotonous in colour, and it seems to be
thought necessary to border it with the ugly
lobelia, regardless of the colours of the flower-
bed itself. All the fancy has gone out of it,
and little or no attempt is made to lay out
the beds on any consecutive scheme. Contrast
this with the beds of the old gardens of New
College, now destroyed.1 In front of the
entrance gateway there was a broad path about
18 feet wide, with cross paths subdividing the
garden into four square plots. On the right-
hand plot as you entered was worked, probably
in rosemary, hyssop, or thyme, the arms of New
College and the motto " manners makyth man "
and the date. In the next plot was a curious
device in flowers. On the left hand was planted
the royal arms and the date 1628 ; and the

1 Logan's Oxonia Illustrata.
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