Proctor, Richard A.
The Great Pyramid: observatory, tomb, and temple — New York, 1883

Page: 42
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/proctor1883/0052
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«μ THE GREAT PYRAMID.

CHAPTER II.
THE RELIGION OF THE GREAT PYRAMID.

During the last few years a new sect has ap-
peared which, though as yet small in numbers, is
full of zeal and fervour. The faith professed by
this sect may be called the religion of the Great
Pyramid, the chief article of their creed being the
doctrine that that remarkable edifice was built for
the purpose of revealing—in the fulness of time,
now nearly accomplished — certain noteworthy
truths to the human race. The founder of the
pyramid religion is described by one of the present
leaders of the sect as ' the late worthy John Taylor,
of Gower Street, London ; ' but hitherto the chief
prophets of the new faith have been in this country
Professor Smyth, Astronomer Royal for Scotland,
and in France the Abbé Moigno. I propose to
examine here some of the facts most confidently
urged by pyramidalists in support of their views.
But it will be well first to indicate briefly the
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