Proctor, Richard A.
The Great Pyramid: observatory, tomb, and temple — New York, 1883

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https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/proctor1883/0197
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APPENDICES.

APPENDIX A.

THE GREAT PYRAMID MEASURES, AND THE DIA-
METERS AND DISTANCES OF THE SUN, EARTH, AND
MOON.

BY JOSEPH BAXENDELL, F.R.A.S.

A few months ago the results of a partial discussion of
the Great Pyramid measures, given by Professor C.
Piazzi Smyth, in the fourth edition of his work entitled
' Our Inheritance in the Great Pyramid,' led me to believe
that the data which had formed the basis of the design
for the pyramid were the diameters and distances of the
sun, earth, and moon, combined with the ratio (π) of the
circumference of a circle to its diameter—a quantity
which forms an important feature in the relations of the
pyramid measures ; and, also, that in order to reduce the
results of the astronomical data to magnitudes suitable
for the design and construction of the pyramid, a scale
of one pyramid inch to a length, one-thousandth part
greater than the present English mile, or 63,360 pyramid
inches, had been used by the architect ; but as I found
that the values of the diameters and distances given in
various astronomical works, especially those for the
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