Proctor, Richard A.
The Great Pyramid: observatory, tomb, and temple — New York, 1883

Page: 78
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/proctor1883/0088
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78 THE GREAT PYRAMID.

CHAPTER III.
THE PROBLEM OF THE PYRAMIDS.

So far as conditions of the soil, surrounding
country, and so forth, are concerned, few positions
could surpass that selected for the Great Pyramid
and its companions. The pyramids of Ghizeh
(fig. i) are situated on a platform of rock, about
150 feet above the level of the desert. The largest
of them, the pyramid of Cheops, stands on an
elevation free all around, insomuch that less sand
has gathered round it than would otherwise have
been the case. How admirably suited these pyra-
mids are for observing-stations is shown by the
way in which they are themselves seen from a
distance. It has been remarked by every one who
has seen the pyramids that the sense of sight is
deceived in the attempt to appreciate their distance
and magnitude. ' Though removed several leagues
from the spectator, they appear to be close at
hand ; and it is not until he has travelled some
miles in a direct line towards them, that he
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