The artists repository and drawing magazine: exhibiting the principles of the polite arts in their various branches — 4.1790

Page: 138
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/artists_repository_drawing_magazine1790/0146
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i0 T R U

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TROPHY was originally an aflemblage of arms,
and fpoils of an enemy, raifed by the conqueror in the
field of battle, as commemorative of his victory : after*
wards, imitative trophies were cut in ftone, marble.
Sec. as triumphal monuments. They are generally
ufed as ornaments and decorations.

The trophy of war, is compofed of fhields and bucklers,
helmets, fwords, lances, he. and other military imple-
ments.

The marine trophy, is formed of prows of fliips, oars,
anchors, he.

The trophy of fcience, comprifes books, globes, and
other articles of ftudy and inveftigation.

The trophy of mufic, confifts of violins, flutes, guitars,
he.

The rujlic trophy, reprefents ploughs, rakes, harrows,
&c.

Whatever is explicit, and intimately related to the
fubject to be expreffed, may enter into a trophy. Vide

ICONOLOGY.

TRUTH, is fpoken of objects fowell reprefented,
that they'are diftinguimable at once : they are fo na-
tural as to require no hefitation to determine for what
they are meant.

There are upon record, feveral very curious in-
ftances of picturefque truth, fuch as that of Zeuxis,
who painted fo naturally a boy holding grapes, that the
birds came and pecked at the fruit: though it muft be
confefled, the remark of Zeuxis himfelf was extremely
juft, who faid, that this very deception was a fign the
boy was not nature* or elfe he would have frightened

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