Beaufort, Emily Anne
Egyptian sepulchres and Syrian shrines: including some stay in the Lebanon, at Palmyra and in Western Turkey ; in 2 vol. (Band 2) — London, 1862

Page: 69
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69

CHAP. XVIII.

the eoyal cities of israel.

In about an hour after leaving Nazareth, we found our-
selves safely at the bottom of the rocky ravine by the
so-called Mount of Precipitation (the most unlikely of
all the monkish traditional sites we had yet seen); and
entered the rich, fine Plain of Esdraelon : it was a pity
to have to ride over it when covered only with stubble
and dead thistles, but at any time and under all aspects
it is a place of so much historical interest that one is
apt to forget the present in the past. We took the path
down the eastern side, passing close to the mountains of
Little Hermon (Jebel el Duhhy) and Grilboa * on the
left,-—both of these run out in promontories on the
plain, and both are of graceful outline — but Grilboa is
by far the most so. On the northern end of El Duhhy,
lying on a little grassy slope half-way up the hill, there
is a small quiet hamlet, with white houses shining
among the trees—this is Nam —still bearing the name
it bore when our Blessed Lord made the widow's heart
to sing for joy. Lower down, and more to the east;
then wrapped in a dark shadow, is Endor,—where the
prosperity-spoiled Saul heard his doom, and the sombre
voice of the spirit announced to him, " to-morrow shalt
thou and thy sons be with me," — and so on the
morrow, and only at a few miles' distance, was the pro-

* Gilbda means the gushing-out fountain;
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