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THE PICTURES.

37

broken. Back,

similar.

116. Letter, under Hadrian; 16 1., frag. Letter, under
Antoninus ; 14 I., frag. Back, two similar fragments.

132. Letter, under Trajan; 20 1., frag.

164-5. Letter on business; 9 1., frag.

166. Deed of 10th of Tiberius, and another of 1st of
Hadrian; both of Akhillis dau. of Herakleides. 19
1., broken.

188. 19th account of Petes, toparchy Moukhis. 17 1., entire.

196. Accounts, good; 23 1.

197. Regulations and accounts; 16 1.

accounts.

198. Accounts; 22 1., good. Back, 15 1

199. Accounts similar.

200. Accounts of corn, etc.; large frags.
201-2. Accounts; large frags.

207. Letter ; 22 1., frag.

208. Accounts, nth of Tiberius; 14 1., broken.
210. Accounts; 19 1., broken.

212-14. Accounts, 15th of Tiberius ; n I., frag.

220. Accounts of Andronikos, tax-gatherer; 12 I., broken.

221. Letters, official; 30-40 I., broken.

222. Accounts ; 16 1., frag. Back, official letter; 12 1., frag.

223. Deed, 5th of Trajan ; 22 I., nearly entire.

224. Letter, official; 14 1., frag., 2nd of (Trajan ?).

228. Accounts; 3 cols., 7 1. Back, 11 1., entire.

229. Accounts; 12 1., frag. Back, 9 1., frag.

232. Accounts; 16 1., frag. Back, 13 1., frag.

233. Letter, official; 18 1., frag.

238. Letter, official; 12 1., under Tiberius.

243. Letter; 12 1., frag.

244. Accounts, 42nd of Augustus; 35 1.; back, 17 1., entire

245. Accounts of household expenses ; nol.

246. Accounts, 14th (of Augustus ?); 12 1.
254. Letter; 12 1., frag.

256. Accounts ; 16 1., frag.; also back.

257-8. Accounts, official.

298. Letter of 4th of Trajan ; 7 1., perfect.

303. Deed of 13th of Trajan; 22 1., perfect.

312. Deed; 14 1., frag.

321. Letter, under Titus ; 26 1., broken.

327. Accounts; 14 1., broken ; back same.

328. Accounts; 22 1., broken.
364. Accounts; 31 1., frag.
381. Accounts; n 1., frag. Back, deed

Vespasian.
385. Accounts; 9 1. entire, and 11 1. frag.
401. Letter, under Aurelius ; 21 1., broken.
418. Deed of 15th Hadrian; 9 1., frag.
441. Letter, naming Aphroditopolis ; 9 1., frag.
472. Deed ; 24 1., frag.

491. Accounts; 27 1., 2 cols, entire, damaged.

492. Accounts ; 18 1., frag.

The pieces not described here are fragments of a
dozen lines and under, of accounts, letters, and deeds.

51. The Greek inscriptions.

Plate
VI. 8. . . . Pharmouth 24, of Marreies. ... the Pasto-

phoros;.....and priest........the stone

(tomb ?).
VII. 1. Ptolemy son of Tyrannos, he lived .... and the
(daughter or wife) Thermoutha lived years 4—
Innocent. Farewell to ye.

VII. 2. On behalf of King Ptolemy.....Petenephies

(son of the pro)phet Soukhos......

VII. 3. Tyrannos son of Ptolemy......

1., frag. Under

Plate
VII. 4.

VII. 5.

VII. 6.
VII. 7.
VII. 9.
VII. 12.

VII. 13.
VII. 16.

VIII. 1.

VIII. 2.

VIII. 3.

VIII. 4.
VIII. 5.
VIII. 6.

VIII. 7.
VIII. 8.
VIII. 9.
VIII. 10.
VIII. n.

Theon son of Heraklides, cut off untimely,
Farewell. Died year 6, Khoiak 9th ; aged 19.

Didymos the turner. Alive I wrote it, and here
I lie, aged 66. (Note that the age has been
scratched in by a later hand, the place having
been left blank by Didymos.)

Dios, aged 55. Innocent.

Kaiap .... and Herais .... his wife. Innocent.

Valerios, aged 44.

Blameless among mortals, in business the best
of men, was Loukios Ε......teimos and . . .

Isidora, farewell, and be of good courage; aged 49.

Demetrios, aged 1 year. (This is finely cut on

(sign of a house ?) of
the harp when he was

a lintel stone.)
Diogenes of The Flute

Arsinoe.
Diogenes who abode as

alive. . . . (He appears to have been a Syrian

musician by the word Nabal. The cloth, fig. 2,

is from the mummy; and the label, fig. 1, was

attached to it.)
Boubastos of the gate of the Thermouthiac

quarter of the metropolis of Arsinoe.
Demos, aged 24, never to be forgotten.
Soukhas, brother of Didas, of the Vicus.
(This is) the body of Apollinarios, son of Diokles

the wool merchant of Arsinoe.
Pantagathos of the Arsinoite nome.
In peace was laid the soul of Peter.
Thermouthis, son of Petesoukhos.
Sabinos . . . Innocent ....
.... rra .... of Anytos, unforgotten for ever.

CHAPTER VI.

THE PICTURES.

By Cecil Smith.

52. From the foregoing Chapter III. the following
facts seem to have been clearly established :—

(1) That the majority of these paintings are to all
intents the work of Greek encaustic * artists.

(2) That they were executed in melted wax with a
brush and a fine stump, possibly of metal.

(3) That their dates may be ranged with certainty
within a narrow limit, beginning with the era of
Hadrian.

We will first briefly examine how far these con-
clusions correspond with what we already know of
the Greek methods of painting, and how far they
show us new lights on ancient life and art.

The controversy that has raged over the question
of encaustic painting has chiefly centred around the
well-known passage of Pliny, N.H. xxxv., § 149:
" Encausto pingendi duo fiiere aniiquitus genera, cera,
et in ebore, cestro id est vericulo, donee classes pingi

* This term may be retained for general use, though the
present portraits are not fused-in or " encaustic " in the strict
sense of the word.
 
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