Studio: international art — 44.1908

Page: 225
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Studio-Talk

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PORCH OF SINGLE-STORY COTTAGE ILLUSTRATED OPPOSITE

taking of meritorious energy, well worth the trouble
and expense it has entailed. The future of a
country depends so largely upon the vigour and
healthy home life (f its lower classes that we
should be grateful for what has been achieved here
as a practical experiment by the Ernst Ludwig
Verein, Hessischer Zentral-Verein fiir die Errich-
tung billiger Wohnungen, and grateful also to the
architects and handicraftsmen assisting in the work.

Wilhelm Scholermann.

(A feiv illustrations belonging to the foregoing
article with some addi-
tional notes are held over
until our next issue.—

The Editor.)

as represented at the exhi-
bition have been duly
chronicled month by
month in this magazine.
The work of the great
mid - Victorian period is
fully represented in ihe
British section with the
most interesting examples
of the art of Millais and
of the epochal genius of
Madox Brown; and the
finest art of the traditions
which it was their mission
to set aside is also well
represented. There are
works by some of our
older living painters which
revive reputations made
yesterday and justify them.
Despite the change of aims, we see that good work
is not subject to fashion, and that pictures which
still attract are those with the old reputation. In
going round the rooms it is pleasant to renew ac-
quaintance with a contemporary painter’s work
in a past phase which is perhaps almost for-
gotten. There are omissions from the collection
which we regret, and the water-colours are not the
most interesting that could have been brought
together. In other respects the Committees are
entitled to congratulation. From the point of view

STUDIO-TALK.

(From Our Own Corres-
pondents.)

London. — The

Fine Art section
of the Franco-
British Exhibi-
tion, were we to attempt
to deal with it adequately,
would launch us into the
writing of a history which
would be far beyond the
scope and province of our
columns, and would, more-
over, be largely a work of
supererogation, inasmuch
as the later developments
of British and French art interior ok single-story cottage with stairs to loft

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