Studio: international art — 44.1908

Page: 280
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1908b/0303
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0.5
1 cm
facsimile
Japanese Colour Prints

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A good piece of gesso
work was to be seen in the
decoration of an oak
casket by Miss Florence
Gower (Regent Street
Polytechnic). Another
casket, good of its kind,
was that in embossed
leather by Mr. Joseph F.

Bennett, of Birmingham
(Margaret Street). Among
the jewellery there was no-
thing so good as the dainty
little comb from Birming-
ham (Vittoria Street),
executed by Mr. Bernard
L. Cuzner, in silver, and
adorned with little birds
in green and blue enamel.

An agreeable and suitable
combination of oak and mistletoe, by
Howchin, of Belfast, was one of the most
of the designs for damask; and of

DESIGN FOR LACE SUPER-FRONTAL FOR AN ALTAR, BY ANNIE LA TROBE (TAUNTON)

Mr. E. E.
satisfactory
those for

_____

tapestry hangings one by Mr. William Clowes, of
Macclesfield, may be singled out. Collectively the
designs for lace were not strong, but one of the
exceptions was the super-frontal for an altar by Miss
Annie J. La Trobe, of Taunton. A book-cover by
Miss Ida M. Thompson, of Birmingham (Margaret
Street), and a sundial by Mr. C. W. Hawkes, of
Bristol, are both worthy of note (see pp. 278, 283).

Of the regular school studies there is not much
to say. Some excellent examples of modelling
from the life were shown, but the drawing and paint-
ing from the life failed generally to reach the level of
former years. For the first time in the history of the
Competition an award has been made for a fashion
drawing, the successful student being Miss Winifred
Davison, of Leeds. W. T. Whitley.

APANESE COLOUR PRINTS.
No. 2, “GIRLS PLAYING THE
GAME OF ‘KEN,’’’ BY HARU-
NOBU.

DESIGN FOR STAINED GLASS, BY CYRIL LAVENSTEIN
(MARGARET ST., BIRMINGHAM)

In the Japanese colour-prints of the 18th
century there is a degree of refinement—of subject,
of colour, and of treatment—which compares
favourably with the bulk of the work produced in
the early part of the 19th century. The low price
at which these prints were sold induced a popular
demand, and the popular demand, then as now,
tended to vulgarize and even debase all work of an
artistic character; so that there is noticeable in
the early 19th century a very marked deterioration
of ideals—a deterioration which became more and
more apparent as[the century became older.

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