Studio: international art — 89.1925

Page: 86
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1925/0092
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FALCONER, BAKER AND CAMPBELL

DESIGN FOR LAMPSHADE
BY MESSRS. FALCONER
BAKER AND CAMPBELL

THE WORK OF MESSRS. FAL-
CONER, BAKER & CAMPBELL,
ARCHITECTS : SECOND ARTICLE.

ALL who are familiar with that fas-
cinating section of the west country
known as " The Cotswolds " must have
been impressed by the unique and dis-
tinctive character of the typical local
architecture, by the mellowed charm of the
delightful old houses which abound there,
and by the remarkable evidences of con-
tinuity in local methods and traditions
which have persisted for centuries. In
many a beautiful old village no jarring
element or upstart intrusion has been
tolerated, so that one can enjoy a consistent
standard of architectural beauty and in-
terest, with a pervading harmony which no
other part of the country can claim in
equal measure. Where new buildings have
been introduced the general character of
existing work has been faithfully echoed,
while restorations have, as a rule, been
undertaken with care and a full sense of
responsibility. Some of our ablest archi-
tects have made a close and sympathetic
study of " Cotswold " architecture, among
86

them Messrs. Falconer, Baker & Campbell,
whose " alterations and additions " to
Great Rissington Manor show how com-
pletely they have grasped and assimilated
the essential and distinctive qualities of the
work bequeathed to us from the past.
Their contribution, however, is by no means
a mere rechauffe, but possesses distinct
individuality and must be considered a
notable and successful achievement. a

It is interesting to compare this essay in
traditional style with the design, by the
same architects, for a reinforced concrete
church illustrated in the January number
of The Studio. It is evident that they do
not allow any personal mannerisms and
prejudices, or any preference for a parti-
cular style, to dominate their work, but
seek inspiration primarily from the factors,
technical, sentimental or economic, which
they find related to the particular problem
confronting them. This is the essence of
sound architecture. From a broad and
imaginative outlook alone can one hope
for any real progress or developments of
permanent value. 0 0 a *>

The pen and ink elevations of The Rat-
ham, Maast, by Mr. J. A. Campbell re-
present an earlier phase of his work when

INTERIOR AT GREAT RISSINGTON
MANOR HOUSE. ALTERATIONS
AND ADDITIONS BY MESSRS.
FALCONER, BAKER AND CAMPBELL
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