Dennis, George
The cities and cemeteries of Etruria: in two volumes (Band 2) — London, 1848

Page: 417
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/dennis1848bd2/0434
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CHAPTER LV.

AREZZO.—ABRETIUM.

Sic tempora yerti
Cernimus, atque illas adsumere robora gentes,
Concidere has.

Ovid.

" Can any good come out of Nazareth 1" was asked of
old. " Can any good come elsewhere than from Arezzo 1"
one is ready to inquire, on beholding the numerous tablets
in the streets of that city, recording the unparalleled
virtues and talents of her sons. Here dwelt " the monarch
of wisdom,"—there "an incomparable pupil of Melpo-
mene,"—this was " the stoutest champion of Tuscany, the
dread and terror of the Turks,"—and that,—the world
ne'er saw his like,—for

" Natura il fece, e poi ruppe la stampa "—*

no unapt metaphor for a city of potters, as this was of old.
Verily may it be said, " Parlano in Arezzo ancora i sassi "
—the very stones are eloquent of the past glories of
Arezzo, and of her maternal pride. Yet some of her
children's names have filled the trump, not of Tuscan, but
of universal fame; and the city which has produced a
Maecenas and a Petrarch may be pardoned for a little
vanity.2

1 This seems the original of those 2 Even Msecenas, who, having found

lines of Byron— his bard, might well have dispensed

"—Nature made but one such man, with it, has his monument in Arezzo.

And broke the die, in moulding Sheri- On the grass-plot by the Duomo is a

dan." granite column to his memory.—"C.

VOL. II. E E
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