Waagen, Gustav Friedrich
Treasures of art in Great Britain: being an account of the chief collections of paintings, drawings, sculptures, illuminated mss., etc. (Supplement): Galleries and cabinets of art in Great Britain — London, 1857

Page: 465
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https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/waagen1857suppl/0479
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Letter X. DUKE OF NORTHUMBEBLAND'S COLLECTION. 465

LETTER X.

Collection of pictures, antiquities, and other objects of art at Alnwick Castle —
Objects of art in Newcastle-on-Tyne— Pictures belonging to W. W.
Bardon, Esq.—-Pictures at Coxlodge Hall — Pictures at Jesmond Cottage
— Pictures at Heddon House — Pictures at Eavensworth Castle — Durham
Cathedral, and MSS. in the Library — Pictures in Durham — Pictures
belonging to the Archdeacon of Durham — Objects of art at Duncombe
Park — Pictures at Elvaston Castle — Pictures at Locko Park — Picture
belonging to Earl of Warwick — Lincoln Cathedral — Collections of art at
Brocklesby — Pictures at Scawby House — Collection at Clumber Park —
Collection at Welbeck Abbey — Pictures at Serlby — Collection at Wim-
pole, seat of the Earl of Hardwicke — MSS. at Cambridge.

COLLECTION OF PICTURES, ANTIQUITIES, AND OTHER OBJECTS
OF ART AT ALNWICK CASTLE,

Seat of the Duke of Northumberland.

On occasion of my visit to England in 1854 I had the privilege
of spending a day at Alnwick Castle as his Grace's guest. This
grand residence with its walls and towers has an effect, though not
on so colossal a scale, which reminds the spectator of Windsor
Castle. Since the period of my visit great alterations have been
undertaken, which, while they have increased the appearance of a
medieval fortress externally, have greatly extended and embel-
lished the space within. The Camuccini collection, which the Duke
purchased at Rome in 1856, is to be placed in this castle. On
this account it appears to me more appropriate to describe the pic-
tures as if already here. They consist of 74 works in number,
by far the greater portion belonging to the Italian schools of the
16th and 17th centuries. At the same time, specimens of the 14th
and 15th centuries are among them, and some examples of the
Netherlandish school of the 17th century. Although the pictures
had been known to me in Rome, yet the kindness of the Duke in
allowing me to study them again on their arrival in Northumber-
land House was very acceptable.

I proceed first to notice the schools of central Italy.

Giotto.—The half of a Diptych from the Barberini collection,

vol. iv. 2 h
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