Studio: international art — 49.1910

Page: 33
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https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1910a/0056
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The Arts and Crafts Society s Exhibition

CHARCOAL STUDY BY H.

for what he can accomplish, but for what can be
accomplished in him.” His pictures are generally
in a silvery and quiet key
of colour. Impressionist
art inclines itself to aspects
of nature which leave a
vivid impression. But we
are now, it may be hoped,
anticipating a more sensi-
tive impressionism. Impres-
sionism of continental
manufacture thrives on
sunny continental scenes,
and our English fields still
wait.

T. Martin Wood.

The passing of the New
Gallery as a place of exhi-
bition for works of art and
its approaching transfor-
mation into a restaurant,
are the subjects of some
regretful comments in the
interesting “Foreword”
contributed by Mr. Walter
Crane to the catalogue of
the Arts and Crafts So-
ciety’s exhibition. With
Mr. Crane’s regrets it is
impossible to help sympa-
thising, for the New Gallery
has been identified with the
Society ever since the year,
1888, that witnessed the
inauguration of both. It has, too, been closely
connected with the name and work not only of

s. HOPWOOD, R.W.S.

The City of Nottingham
Art Museum has had pre-
sented to its collections by
Mr. James Orrock, R.I.,
twelve cabinet sized pic-
tures by English masters,
including Richard Wilson,
James Holland, William
Etty, John Constable,
Richard Parkes Bonington
and Henry Dawson.

TRIPTYCH FOR THE CHURCH OF ST. MARTIN’S, KENSAL RISE,
PAINTED IN TEMPERA BY J. D. BATTEN
CARVING AND GILDING EXECUTED BY MARY BATTEN AND ASSISTANTS
{Copyright reserved)

The arts
AND CRAFTS
S OC I ETY’S
EXHIBITION
AT THE NEW
GALLERY.

33
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