Studio: international art — 49.1910

Page: 213
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https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1910a/0237
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Recent Designs in Domestic Architecture

“BREAD” (“THE BLUE BIRD ”) BY CAYLEY ROBINSON

Recent designs in domes-
tic ARCHITECTURE.

Sir George Frampton’s new house in

St. John’s Wood represents the fulfilment of a long-
cherished plan of building for himself a residence
in which he could embody his own ideas of con-

struction and decoration. He was fortunate
enough to find an admirable site on the western
slope of Carlton Hill, in the seclusion of a neigh-
bourhood of large gardens, although within a
hundred yards or so of the great thoroughfare of
Maida Vale. Here, set amid lawns and flower
beds, stood, until last year, a Mid-Victorian
suburban house of a commonplace and ugly type,
and on the foundation and core of this house Sir
George has reared his own. His ideal was not a
so-called “artistic” house, but a house that an
artist would like to live in, and that he has
achieved his aim is proved by the combination of
simplicity and practical usefulness shown in the
charming rooms and workmanlike studios at
Carlton Hill.

The new house shows, naturally, in numberless
details, the impress of the mind of the original and
gifted artist by whom it was projected. Although
little of Sir George’s actual handiwork is to be
seen except in the studio, every room shows some-
thing of his individuality, something that marks
the house as his and that of no other artist. The
visitor entering by the oak door, reached by steps
of red brick, passes through a small outer hall

SIR GEORGE BRAMPTON'S HOUSE AT ST. JOHN’S WOOD

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