Studio: international art — 49.1910

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The Societd des Peintres et Sculpteurs

The exhibition of the

SOCIETE DES PEINTRES ET
SCULPTEURS IN PARIS.

This Society of painters and sculptors, formerly
known as the Societe' Nouvelle, is to-day emphati-
cally the most homogeneous and the strongest of
all the numerous societies whose various exhibi-
tions follow one after the other in the Paris galleries.
There is in fact no group, with the exception of
this one, that succeeds so amply, and which
achieves the difficult feat of uniting no less than
thirty artists who are all men of great talent. It is
for this reason that we propose to single out the
recent exhibition of this society for very special
notice, and to deal with it in preference to others
of a similar kind, for practically every work, and
certainly every artist who exhibited, deserves to be
carefully studied in detail.

M. Albert Besnard was represented this year by
five pictures, no one of which it must be admitted
was of quite the same importance as certain works

shown by the artist in preceding years—the portrait
of Mme. Besnard or his F'eerie intime for instance,
both of which aroused a great deal of attention;
nevertheless all the paintings shown here were ex-
ceedingly fine and of great warmth of tone and
very beautiful in handling. The one that attracted
my attention the most was entitled Le premier
Acte, showing two ladies in evening dress in the
semi-darkness of a box at the theatre. His other
exhibits, Une Adolescente, Eledre, Une Italie?ine,
were in the same inimitable manner of this accom-
plished painter.

M. J. Blanche owes his high reputation to his
charming portraits, but he is an artist of such
varied and diverse talent, that not content to
specialise in one branch of his art, he has in
recent years been engaged in painting most inter-
esting still-life pieces and interiors; but in such
works as these he remains always the same remark-
ably fine colourist so well known to us. I singled
out for particular comment his Salon rose, a canvas
painted with surprising freedom of touch, and in

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