Studio: international art — 84.1922

Page: 248
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1922a/0268
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THE MODERN BOOKPLATE

as architectural buildings. There are two
other coast scenes by Henry Bright and
E. M. Wimperis respectively. 0 0
Exigencies of space will not permit of
many other excellent paintings, both in
oil and water-colours, being described.
The Rienaecker collection is a remark-
ably fine one of British landscape painting
and well represents the art to the end of
last century. It is the owner's maxim
that every work shall be, like Caesar's wife,
above suspicion. To such an extent does
he carry out this rule that, recently, when
told that a small drawing by one of the
great masters was open to doubt, he at
once tore it into pieces. H. M. C.

[Erratum. In the second of these articles,
in our last issue, a water-colour by William
Clarkson Stanfield, R.A. (1792-1867), was
through a misunderstanding referred to
and reproduced as the work of his son,
G. Clarkson Stanfield.—Editor.] 0

WOODCUT BOOKPLATE
ADAPTED FROM MACLISE
BY JAMES GUTHRIE

248

BOOKPLATE, FROM
A PLATE PRINT BY
JAMES GUTHRIE

THE MODERN SPIRIT IN THE ART
OF THE BOOKPLATE. 000

IT would be easy to lay too much weight
upon the bookplate, or ask so little of it
that a name scrawled with a pen inside a
book would describe and obliterate the art
in one brief gesture. We have not suffered
from any critical profundity, perhaps, but
might be allowed to say that the real place
of the modern bookplate is somewhere
apart from the dull contagion of scholar-
ship on the one hand, and from the casual
disparagement of those whose interests lie
elsewhere, on the other. The zeal of its
friends has often enough made much cry
about little wool; public neglect and the
obscurity of its artistic principle have done
their utmost to consign it to a humble
position among minor arts or cults for the
use of amateurs. 0000
There is something to be said for any
art which, in spite of all direct and in-
sidious attacks upon its existence, not only
continues in a traditional form but gathers
new force and finds new grounds for con-
tinuance. Time was when the critic must
have asked himself what other line of
enquiry could be pursued. He had dwelt
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