Barrow, John [Editor]
Dictionarium Polygraphicum: Or, The Whole Body of Arts Regularly Digested: Illustrated with Fifty-six Copper-Plates. In Two Volumes (Band 2) — London, 1758

Page: 176
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/barrow1758bd2/0197
License: Public Domain Mark Use / Order
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i76 POL

at Utrecht, and in England ; excelled in naked boys, landfeapes,
ruins, and fmall figures; died in 1667, aged 77 years.

POETICAL Fury, is reprefented, in painting, &c. by a brilk
young beau of a ruddy complexion, winged, crowned with laurel
bound about with ivy, in a writing pofture, but turning his head
back toward heaven.—The wings declare the quicknefs of his
fancy, which foars aloft and carries an encomium with it, which
Hill remain frefh and green as the laurel and ivy intimate ; look-
ing upwards, the ideas of fupernatural things, which he writes
down.

POETRY, is reprefented, in painting, &c. by a lady in a
fky-coloured garment, with ftars and wings on her head, a harp
in her right hand, crowned with a laurel, and a fwan at her
feet.—The fky colours fignify that none can excel in this art, if
he be not endowed with extraordinary talents from heaven ; the
harp, becaufe they ufed to make Poetry and mufic to be in a
harmonious concert; the crown fhews that the poet's defign is
to be renowned; the fwan is the emblem of mufic; the ffarry
robe divinity, as having its original from heaven.

POLISHER, an inftrument called alfo a burnifJher, ufed for
polifhing and burnifhing gold, filver, and other metals, when
gilt or filvered, and matters of other kinds proper to take polifh.

Gilders ufe an iron Polifher to prepare their metals before
gilding, and the blood-ftone to give them the bright polifh after
gilding.

The Polifher ufed by the fpur and bit makers, &c. is part
iron, part freel, and part wood. This inftrument confifts of an
iron bar, with a wooden handle at one end, and a hook at the
other, to fallen it to another piece of'wood, held in the vice,
while the workman is working.

In the middle of the bow within fide, is what they properly
call the Polifher, which is a triangular piece of fteel, with a tail,
by which it is riveted to.the bow.

A cutler's Polifher, is a kind of wooden wheel or grinder,
made of walnut-tree, about an inch in thicknefs, and of what
diameter or largenefs you pleafe ; this is turned by the great
wheel ; and it is with this they polifh and fmooth their works
with emery and putty.

The Polifhers ufed by fpeclacle-makers, are pieces of wood a
foot long, (even or eight inches broad, and an inch and a half
thick, covered with old caftor hat, whereon they polifh thefhell
and horn frames their fpecracle glaffes are to be fet in.

POLISHING locking-glajfes. After looking-glaffes have been
ground, they are to be poldhed, they ftill looking but fomething
like a flate. The polifhing is performed in the following man-
ner : The plate is laid down on a {tone placed horizontal!}', and,

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