Barrow, John [Hrsg.]
Dictionarium Polygraphicum: Or, The Whole Body of Arts Regularly Digested: Illustrated with Fifty-six Copper-Plates. In Two Volumes (Band 2) — London, 1758

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0.5
1 cm
facsimile
1H RUB

<defcends from the mountains towards the middle of the ifland :
Some few are alfo found in the ground.

The Rubies of Ceylon are ordinarily brighter, and more beau-
tiful than thofe of Pegu ; but they are rare, the king of Ceylon
prohibiting his people to gather them, or traffic with them.

There are Rubies alfo found in Europe, particularly in Bohe-
mia and Hungary, efpecially in the former, where there is amine
of flints of divers fizes, which upon breaking are fometimes found
t& contain Rubies, as fine and hard as any of the Eafi.

The value of Rubies, from one carat or four grains, is rec-
koned in Diclionaire de Commerce as follows:



1.

s.

d.

A Ruby of one carat is worth

i



0

■- two carats -

9

0

0

- three carats -•

22

10

g

■-■ four carats -

33

l5

o

- five carats -1

45

0

g

- fix carats -

67

10

0

- feven carats -•

84

0

o

- eight carats -

106

0

o

—-■ nine carats -

150

0

o

- ten carats -

216

0

0

"Rubies are ufually diftinguifhed into two kinds, the balaffe and
fpinelle ; but there are fome authors who diifinguifh them into
four kinds, viz. the Ruby, rubicelle, balaffe, and fpinelle.

It is their different degrees of colour that make their different
value and beauty.

The balaffe Ruby is of a vermeil rofe-colour; the fpinelle of
a flame colour.

It is faid that the inhabitants of Pegu have the art of heighten-
ing the rednefs and brilliant of Rubies, by laying them in the
fire, and giving them a certain degree of heat.

The Ruby is formed in a ftony fubftance, or marcafite of a
rofe-colour, called mother of Ruby ; it has not all its colour and
■luff re at once, but they come to it by degrees. At the firff. it
■grows whitifb, and, as it approaches to maturity, becomes red.
Kence it comes to pafs, that we have white Rubies ; others half
white, half red ; others blue and red, called fapphire Rubies.

When a Ruby exceeds twenty carats, it may be called a car-
buncle.

There are feveral manners of counterfeiting Rubies; and fome
have carried the imitation fo far as to deceive the moft able lapi-
daries.

To make orientalRubies. The Ruby, which is a precious
€ione, diaphanous and very radiant, ought to have the colour of

blood
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