Barrow, John [Editor]
Dictionarium Polygraphicum: Or, The Whole Body of Arts Regularly Digested: Illustrated with Fifty-six Copper-Plates. In Two Volumes (Band 2) — London, 1758

Page: 270
DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/barrow1758bd2/0295
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To [often Silver. Put as many wedges, as you have melted
one night, into a crucible, and fet it into a furnace, butfo as they
may not melt, 2nd they will be foft and fair.

Or thus: Take honey and oil, of each a like quantity; quench
Silver or gold in it three or four times, and it will be fofter.

To tinge Silver of a gold colour. Take fine gold, fine Silver,
good brafs, or brafs and copper calcined with fulphur vivum, of
each a like quantity ; melt them down together, and it mall ap-
pear to be gold of eighteen carats fine.

Another way to tinge Silver. Take of quickfilver an ounce
and a half, of leaf gold half an ounce; mix them, and put them
into a glafs retort well luted ; fet it on the fire till it grow hot;
then take it off, and add to it quickfilver purged one ounce, fal
armoniac half an ounce, fal ellebrot a quarter of an ounce, borax
one drachm ; then feal up the glafs hermetically, and fet it into a
continual fire for three days ; then take it out, and let it cool,
open the retort, take out the matter, and powder it very fine ; of
which powder mix one ounce with five ounces of Silver, and it
will tinge it into a good gold colour.

The fal ellebrot is made as follows : Take pure common
fait, fal gemmae, and fal alcali in powder, of each half an ounce ;
juice of mint two ounces, fpring water two pounds ; mingle them
and evaporate.

Quickfilver is purged by warning it in fharp vinegar three or
four times, and {training it through a mammy leather, or by fub-
iiming it, which is better.

To bring Silver into a calx. This is done by making it into
an amalgama with quickfilver, and then fubliming it; or by dif-
folving it in aqua-fortis, and precipitating it with the folution of
falts in fair water, and then wafhing it often with fair water to
free it from the falts; or elfe by mingling the filings with fublim-
ed mercury, and afterwards caufing the mercury to afcend in a
retort, which will leave at bottom the calx of Silver fit for jew-
els, &c.

To blanch Silver. Take fa! armoniac, roch alum, alum
plumofum, fal gem, argol, Roman vitriol, of each a like quantity;
powder them, mix them, and diffolve them in fair water ; in
this boil the Silver fo long, till you find it of an excellent white-
nefs.

To Silver any metal. DifTolve fine Silver in ftrong aqua-
fortis ; put to it fo much tartar in fine powder, as will make it
into a pafie; rub the metal with it, and it will look like fine Sil-
ver.

SIN, is reprefented, in painting, &c. by a vouth blind, black
and fiark naked, who feems to walk through crooked wavs, and
by precipices, girt round with a ferpent gnawing his heart.

2 His
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