Perring, John Shae ; Howard-Vyse, Richard William Howard
Operations carried on at the Pyramids of Gizeh in 1837: with an account of a voyage into upper Egypt, and Appendix (Band 3): Appendix — London, 1842

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APPENDIX.

77

"pure." It is followed by three undulating lines, a scarabseus, and
the figure of a man sitting. Although the two lines are not connected,
they seem to have been executed at the same time, and, from analogy,
not to be more antient than the twenty-sixth dynasty; and if the line
contains the unexplained titles used during the era of the Psammetichi
and Ptolemies, it should precede Fig 7.8

The Pyramids in Ethiopia appear to be less antient than those of
Gizeh, and many of the smaller were, probably, of a comparatively
recent date, and were erected in imitation of the original buildings.
These imperfect inscriptions cannot, however, be considered as a posi-
tive proof of the age of the edifice.

PYRAMIDS OF LISHT.

Mr. Perring went to Mensheeh on the 21st of October, to
await the arrival ofa guard from Cairo, which the disturbed state
of the country made essentially necessary. On the 25th four
soldiers arrived from Ali Bey, the sub-governor of Cairo, to say
that Mr. Perring could not with any degree of safety proceed by
land, even with a guard. He accordingly procured a boat, and
leaving Mensheeh on the 27th, went across the inundation to
Dashoor, round the northern and eastern sides of which place,
the canal, known by the names El Bainhee, El Menb.ee, and
Babr Youseff, runs in a circuitous course, so as to avoid the
site of the antient town. Beyond Barnasht the canal is evidently
artificial, and marks the limits of the cultivated ground. Mr.
Perring passed the night at Tahnie, whence the principal road
crosses the Desert to the Faioum, a little to the northward of
the Pyramids of Lisht, where Mr. Perring arrived about twelve
o'clock on the 28th.

They are usually distinguished by this name by the Arabs,
but they are also called the Pyramids of Metanyeh, or of Bemha.
Metanyeh is about two miles and a half to the eastward ; but
Bemha,9 although still farther off to the north-eastward, occupies
an antient site, probably that of Peine, or Pemeau, and has,
therefore, of the two, perhaps a better claim to the Pyramids.

8 A figure dancing is also seen in titles upon Stele, in the United Service
Museum.

9 This does not appear on the Map.
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