Studio: international art — 42.1908

Page: 269
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https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1908/0303
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H. Hughes-Stanton

a Bruges study (Mcsdag Collection) BY j. BOSBOOM

the most complete, power-
ful, and distinguished
artists of his country,
whose name will certainly,
as long as true art is under-
stood and appreciated,
stand among the very best
of his time.

Ph. Zilcken.

[We desire to express our
indebtedness to Messrs.
Boussod, Valadon & Co.,
of The Hague, for their
courtesy in permitting us
to reproduce numerous
interesting examples of
Bosboom's work to serve as
illustrations to the foregoing
article.—The Editor.]

THE LANDSCAPE
PAINTINGS OF MR. H.
HUGHES - STANTON.
BY MARION HEP-
WORTH DIXON.

If the French axiom be true that
Le pay sage est un Hat de tame it seems
pretty certain that the training of the
modern realist leaves him but poorly
equipped on the more poetic or imagi-
native side of his art. Not that the
impressionists admit the fact. We
know their doctrines. Since Monet
painted the same hayrick seven (or
was it seventeen?) times, declaring
that light is the subject of all pictures,
landscape painters may be said to have
been exclusively occupied with the
problems of filein air. But much water
has flowed under the bridge since
Monet's day. We no longer make a
fetish of the "god of things as they
are." The new language has been
acquired. We speak it freely. Habit
has accustomed us to a certain scien-
tific realism in the least pretentious
canvas. What we begin to look for is
not so much a glib expression of
manual dexterity, of which at the

[les andeleys—chateau gallian " by h. hughes-stanton

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