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Studio: international art — 21.1901

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Studio- Talk

can fail to discover, in the manners and customs of The collection was international in its appeal,

their compatriots, in their national character and and a general improvement was noticeable in all

mode of life, the wherewithal to create a decorative that appertains to tone arrangement, to the choice

style. In the light of what has been done in this of a good point of view, and to the value of

direction by England, Germany, Belgium, and simplicity in the backgrounds of portraits. On the

France, the efforts being put forth by Austria are other hand, there were traces of that familiar

invested with no little novelty and importance. The over-refinement, which so often reveals itself when

future will decide—and after what we have seen the a period of advance in any form of art-work has

answer is easily divined—whether this movement is reached its culminating point. Photographers

merely momentary and artificial, or whether it is ought never to forget that delicacy without strength

based on a real social demand. is insipidity.

Gabriel Mourey.

The landscape section, considered as a whole,
was more promising than the figure section, and
especial praise may be given to the capital
(From our own Correspondents.) studies of pine trees by Mr. George Davison, to

STUDIO-TALK.

LONDON. —The
eighth exhibi-
tion of the
Photographic
Salon attracted many per-
sons to the Dudley Gallery,
and there can be no doubt
that it was considerably
more interesting than any
of its predecessors. Here
and there, it is true, an
exhibitor had taken in-
finite pains to show that
he wished his photo-
graphs to pass muster as
reproductions of feeble
drawings; but, on the
whole, this sort of folly
was not only less ex-
travagant than it has
been on previous occa-
sions, it was also less
frequent. Indeed, there
was just enough of it to
serve as a useful foil to
the diverse aims of those
who were content to be
thoughtful experimenters
in true photography. It
may be interesting to try
to make a photograph
look like an etching, or
a charcoal sketch, or a
wash drawing,, but the
result is inevitably a
sham, and therefore
without value.

'THE CROWN OF LOVE" BY WILLIAM R. COLTON

JI33
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