Studio: international art — 78.1919

Page: 178
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https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1919c/0184
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MR. E. S. LUMSDEN'S INDIAN STUDIES

"THE WELL-HEAD"
BY E. S. LUMSDEN, R.E.

rapidly on the spot, and intended for the
most part as studies for large pictures, such
as he has been in the habit of exhibiting,
Mr. Lumsden reveals the true painter's eye
with the artist's spirit. In these studies, five
typical examples of which are here repro-
duced, while a representative selection is
now on exhibition in the galleries of
Messrs. Taylor and Brown in Edinburgh,
we have the sense of the East interpreted
with an intuitive sincerity of vision and an
artistry of exquisite delicacy and sensibility.
Here are no busy touring artist's clever
sketches, no deliberately composed oriental
subjects done to make a u one-man show."
These studies represent the con amore ex-
pression of a temperament drawn by sheer
sympathy and understanding into intimate
artistic communion with aspects of native
Indian life which, while of daily occurrence
and immemorial tradition, are, to the vision
and feeling of the artist to whom always
“ East is East," penetrated ever with a
beauty of mystery . And it is this beauty of
178

every-day Indian mystery that Mr. Lums-
den's impressions convey to us. Not one
of them but was prompted by a genuine
artistic emotion experienced through the
colour and character of the actual scene ;
and, with no laboured brushwork but with
a happy impromptu of translucent painting,
the shapes of the tones are made to take
this pictorial life and significance, while the
transparency of the atmosphere is shown
softly harmonizing the colours in their
characteristic and pictorial distinction.
Design seems to happen inevitably. Look
at Jodhpur—the Chauk, for instance, re-
produced here in colours. This represents
a typical market scene, such as one can see
now, I believe, only in the desert cities of
Rajputana, where Western influences are
still much to seek, and the camels ** bring
the deserts in." Here is colour in plenty,
but with what charm of artistic truth it is
all disposed and harmonized. Not a tone
obtrudes, but how valuable is that dark
bull in the foreground on the left, and how
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