International studio — 22.1904

Page: CCXCIII
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GUILD OF ARTS AND CRAFTS OF NEW YORK

welt as to such pieces of craftsmanship as the art-
dealers, with discerning selection, from time to time
discover and place upon the market. This depart-
ment, under the heading " Notes on the Crafts,"
will be a purely editorial one, with the main object
of informing our readers concerning the most prom-
ising specimens of the crafts which come under our
observation.
Among the Exhibitions of Crafts which have
recently been held, a particularly interesting one
was that of the GUILD OF ARTS AND CRAFTS OF
NEW YORK, which held its Fourth Anniversary in
March. The Guild was formed by a handful of
Art and Craft workers, comprising a Class in Design
conducted by Miss Amy Mali Hicks; the growth
of this nucleus has been gradual and healthy, so
that at present the Association occupies an entire
house constituting Work-shops, Members' Rooms,
Class Rooms, Sales Rooms, etc. The organization
is somewhat distinctive in being entirely unendowed,
having supported itself by means of membership
fees and sales since the outset. One of our illus-
trations shows a very handsome and well-designed
chair, with wrought-leather seat and back, the work
of Mrs. Charlotte H. Busck, teacher of the Leather
Class in the Guild. Our other illustration from the
Exhibition shows some of the Textiles, Dyed
Fabrics, Rugs, etc. Vegetable dyes are exclusively
used in coloring, and all dyeing is done by the

Guild workers themselves. BEREA COLLEGE con-
tributed to the Exhibition an interesting collection
of Weavings and Hangings, especially attractive
for softness of coloring and fineness of texture.
Another interesting section in the Exhibition was
the Copper work executed by Mr. G. Busck, com-
prising copper plates and bowls, perforated and
embossed, and finished with iridescent coloring.
Bookbindings by Ellen G. Starr, and Peter Verberg,
of Chicago, and Miss Marot, of Philadelphia, were
particularly commendable. Silver-work and jewelry
in the shape of unique rings, and silver bowls with
chasings and repoussti, enamel pins and brooches,


FROM THE ERKINS STUDIOS
were well represented by uncommonly promising
exhibits. The basket department showed work in
reed and raffia, Mary White exhibiting a particularly
quaint bowl-shaped basket with a design of moths
woven in. Among wood-carvings, Carl Von Ryd-
ingsvard had several distinctive and original pieces,
well executed.
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