International studio — 61.1917

Page: CXXVIII
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/international_studio61/0322
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The Keramic Society of Greater New York

Courtesy American Museum of Natural History, New York
A TEA-TABLE ARRANGED BY NINA HATFIELD


The keramic society of
GREATER NEW YORK
BY MIRA BURR EDSON
The annual exhibition of the Ker-
amic Society of New York was held this year at
the Museum of Natural History, between March
25 and April 6, and was especially notable in
presenting colour harmonies as applied to the
setting of tables. Each of the tables shown was
characterized by some definite colour-scheme to
which all the decorative accessories deferred.
This display is in direct line with the newer
ideas in interior decoration in which colour, as
such, plays so important a part. The forms
modernly employed have artistic value, it is true,
and the relation of one to another must be care-
fully observed, but the colour interest is para-
mount and the colour-contrast must be strong
and cheerful and lend itself to the forming of an
atmosphere in the room it decorates. Beside this
colour atmosphere the new decoration aims to

simplify arrangements, and in this the cottage
and bungalow have exerted a marked influence.
All of this is significant, symbolizing as it does
the thoughts current now—but of this another
time. Colour, at all events, symbolizes life,
vitality and vigour and a seeking of and aptitude
for that happiness that consists in the wholesome
enjoyment of natural things. In one of his essays
John Ruskin notes the general characteristics of
those nations which have loved colour, pure
strong colour, and makes some psychological de-
ductions as to emotional richness and purity.
Another influence and one which is very evident
in the present exhibition is that of primitive and
peasant art. In one instance, this is carried so
far that a table and chairs have been designed for
the exhibition and decorated in the bold, peasant
style of painted furniture; the same general
motif running through all of the decoration upon
the table. Another exhibit has a cloth of white
with a broad checkered band in blue and white,
with napkins of the same, and upon this the blue

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