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Studio: international art — 11.1897

DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page / Citation link: 
https://doi.org/10.11588/diglit.18389#0037

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Revival of English Domestic Architecture

HOUSE AND STUDIO IN ST. DUNSTAN'S ROAD, WEST KENSINGTON C. F. A. VOYSEY, ARCHITECT

the placing of the chimney-stacks are entirely not even of a decorated inscription setting forth the

characteristic of their author. It is a home worthy glory of the architect; but when they are apparent,

its pastoral name ; a building which seems in every they are invariably planned to yield some little

way suggestive of the clean, luxurious domesticity pleasure to the occupants.

of an English homestead ; so that as you study it in In a House at Frensham (p. 16) for E. J. Horni-
various photographs and plans you are conscious of man, Esq., we have a very typical " Voysey" building,
a yearning for all the leisurely comforts a visit to The proportions of the roof, the angle buttresses, the
such a house implies. window which breaks into the eaves, the casements,
The Six Cottages, Elmesthorpe, for the Earl of each slightly unlike the other, and especially the
Lovelace, are particularly picturesque, and they curious dormer which appears below the chimney-
are moreover, extremely commodious and com- stack, are distinctly characteristic of Mr. Voysey's
pact. The porches coupled in pairs, with the manner, comely and pleasant. The interior views
great eaves of thatch brought over them, help to show the same rigid distrust of ornament. Yet the
give a sense of shelter that suggests a hen cover- homely looking, wide fireplace, no less than the more
ing her chickens. The bench outside each porch conventional mantelpiece in another room, reveal
is the only addition to the bare necessities of a house, beauty gained by harmony in the balance of struc-
and yet this simple and inexpensive item betrays tural parts. In the pillars to the latter mantelpiece
sympathy with the inmates — a reward of rest Mr. Voysey abjures bases for his columns, as he did
after honest labour. In touches of this sort Mr. in another design at the last Arts and Crafts.
Voysey betrays plainly the accord with humanity Whether this innovation is quite justified need not
which softens the apparent austerity of his work. be discussed here, but from long associations there
His "extras" do not take the form of ornament, can be little doubt that the absence of a plinth
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