International studio — 31.1907

Page: 199
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/international_studio31/0213
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Some Medallions by Mr. A. Bruce-Joy, R.H.A.



“THE LABYRINTH, BARCELONA”

BY ELISEO MEIFREN

that penetrates and pervades and purifies alike his labour
and his life.
The landscapes of Meifren speak bluntly of the
worship of the open air. Truly a fortunate man is this,
doing his duty in the cause of art, developing from day
to day a bold and beautiful technique, and showing us
—what many had not dreamed of till this moment—
the multiform and multicolor landscapes of contemporary
Spain. Leonard Williams.

does not degenerate; in-
deed, the longer he works
the more he widens his
range and the more boldly
does he attack the problems
of his craft. It is from
men of this type that we
get the art wrhich is most
capable of exciting and
holding our interest—the
art which means something
and has a permanent value;
they are the real leaders in
their profession who show
what is possible to the artist
possessed of legitimate am-
bition, and by their assist-
ance the way is cleared for
new movements.
At the same time there
is an obvious necessity
that the man who has the right endowr-
ment of originality should be completely

Prof. Singer desires us to state that in his article on
Meissen porcelain, which appeared in our February number,
he was unaccountably led to refer to Herr Hoesel, one
of the artists appointed to a life position at the factory,
as having died shortly after his appointment. This he is
glad to say is fortunately not the case, Prof. Hoesel being
still alive and active. In the opening paragraph of the
same article the name Herzog should have been Horold.

s

OME MEDALLIONS BY MR. A.
BRUCE-JOY, R.H.A.

The artist who is not a narrow specialist and
who does not limit his practice by too definite bounds, is
always worthy of attention because he is likely at any
moment to develop in unexpected directions and to find
fresh ways of expressing his convictions. His work never
settles down into a mere matter of routine, into the
repetition of certain stock ideas which he has used so
often that his dependence upon them has become simply
mechanical. Because he remains ready to respond to
new impressions, his power of initiative and his love
of experiment do not diminish, and his artistic vitality

BRONZE BUST OF H. BALFOUR FERGUSSON,
ESQ., OF DUNDEE BY A. BRUCE-JOY

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