International studio — 55.1915

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INTERNATIONAL
• STUDIO
VOL.LV. No. 217 Copyright, 1915, by John Lane Company MARCH, 1915

PHILADELPHIA’S HUNDRED AND
TENTH ANNUAL
BY W. H. de B. NELSON
Until the end of this month visitors
to Penn’s ancient city can see some four hundred
paintings and two hundred pieces of statuary
attractively arranged about the rotunda, tran-
septs and galleries of the Academy. Philadelphia
makes no attempt to conceal a very proper pride
in possessing the oldest art institute and the oldest
art traditions in America, and, consequently, every
effort is made to ensure a successful yearly achieve-
ment by the display of all that is best. Though
we willingly acclaim a great show of art, yet the
most cursory or complete tour of the all too
numerous galleries only confirms the opinion that
Mr. John Trask’s tireless pursuit of important
canvases for the Panama Exposition has left a
smaller field of selection. This and the fact that
owing to the war so few Americans abroad have

been able to send their usual contributions. Look
about as wTe may, we fail to see the usual salon
pieces—big figure-work, big marines, interiors,
animal paintings and great genre canvases. On
all sides are 50 by 40 or 40 by 30 landscapes, most
of which are old friends that have been seen in
New York, Washington and elsewhere, along with
a quantity of portraits, only a few of which are of
striking quality. It is not to be inferred that the
exhibition is not exceedingly interesting. The
American artist yields to nobody in landscape
painting optically observed, and here we have the
key-note of the exhibition. The visitor who goes
with a fresh eye, to whom all the pictures are hith-
erto unknown quantities, can assuredly come
away rejoicing. Why must we forego animal sub-
jects? True, W. Glackens gives us a vermilion
dog by the seashore, J. T. Pearson has a hindquar-
ter view of a farm horse, not to mention a large,
defunct-looking rooster and some ill-nourished
cattle wending their way despondently across a

PICNIC PARTY BY GIFFORD BEAL


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