International studio — 55.1915

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Copyright, 1915, by John Lane Company

MAY, 1915

VOL. LV. No. 219

INTERNATIONAL
STUDIO

HE SPRING ACADEMY
BY W. H. DE B. NELSON
With the return of spring the Na-
tional Academy of Design in New York
City has once more held its annual and ninetieth


exhibition. Departing from usual custom, it was
decided to make it an entirely free exhibition, and
to judge by the capital attendance the experiment
has been crowned with success. If art can be

popularized, the best way to set about the task is
undoubtedly to do away with gate money. Possi-
bly in time the Academy may find it convenient
even to provide representatives of the press with
needed photographs of the exhibits, thus stepping
into line with Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Washing-
ton, Chicago and other art centres which follow
this plan not merely as a matter of courtesy, but
more as a matter of course. Possibly before the
advent of the millennium they may even proffer
cakes and lemonade. Free entrance is not the

only sign of the occasion. This exhibition marks
the official exodus of Mr. John W. Alexander, who
in discarding his mantle may well exclaim:
“ Ilic victor ccestus artemque repono.”
The display embraced close upon five hundred
numbers, including thirty-four pieces of statuary,
mostly of a small character, excepting the exquis-
ite young girl in bronze by Rudulph Evans, stand-
ing at attention with an apple in either hand.
That most difficult pose has been gracefully
achieved, and the stiffness of the heel-to-heel posi-
tion does not obtrude to mar in any way the com-
position. An excellent bronze is Tying the Sandal,
by Charles Louis Hinton, who has pleasingly
solved a difficult problem. From all sides the
bending figure presents fine sweeping lines and
charming contours.
So much is truly good art in the four well-hung
galleries that we may be pardoned for calling

attention later on to a lower standard of art, of
course without singling out examples.
F. Waugh gives us the many-twinkling smile of
ocean in his South Atlantic, which is a splendid bit
of objective painting. Paul Dougherty was con-
spicuous by his absence. A somewhat bizarre
canvas by Gifford Beal reveals him at his best. No
elephants on this occasion, but a scene from the


POLLY WITH THE
ROMAN SCARF

BY A. MAYNARD
WILLIAMSON

LXXI
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