Studio: international art — 9.1897

Page: 246
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/studio1897/0262
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0.5
1 cm
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Japanese Flower Arrangement

flower receptacles, such as those of a well-frame, of bamboo vases and narrow-necked bronze vases ;
well-bucket, chariot, gourd, boat, raft, and moon- for Summer, flower baskets, bronze basins, wooden
crescent. The crescent and boat shapes are gener- tubs and very wide-mouthed vases, with the pur-
ally suspended, and carry trailing arrangements of pose of displaying as large a surface of water as
flowers suggestive of their elevated position. Bam- possible ; for Autumn, boat-shaped vases and
boo tubes cut into forms rudely in imitation of vessels of porcelain; and for Winter, gourd-shaped

and narrow-necked recep-
tacles.

As a general rule utensils
having other household func-
tions such as jars or drink-
ing vessels should not be
used for arranging flowers
in ; though famous masters
have often violated this rule.

A certain harmony is
sought between the vessel
used and the floral arrange-
ment. This harmony may
be one of proportion, shape,
material, or decoration. It
often happens that the
flowers used, the design of
the vase in which they are
placed, and the picture sus-
pended to the wall behind
are parts of a connected
composition or idea. Such
would be a bronze vase
decorated with tortoises,
holding pine branches, and
placed before a painting of
stocks ; or a broad basin full
of water containing maple
branches backed by a pic-
ture of deer. The pine,
stock and tortoise are fre-
quently represented in com-
bination as emblematical of
longevity; and the redden-
ing maple and deer together
express the idea of Autumn,
the maple at the same time
being associated with some
beautiful river scenery in
Japan. The normal propor-
tion for a flower composi-

boats or junks and hung horizontally are often tion in ordinary standing vases is generally from
used. Other vessels of bamboo, basket work and one and a half to twice the height of the vase, but
even of bronze, iron, or decayed wood, are made to this does not apply to low saucer-shaped vases,
hook against a wall or pillar, by means of a slit in the proportion being then measured from the
the back. height of the vase together with the raised stand

Some professors classify flower vessels according on the miniature table that invariably carries it.
to the seasons, recommending for Spring the use In the case of low, broad bowls and basins, such
246

AT AN EXHIBITION OF ARRANGED FLOWERS FROM A JAPANESE COLOUR-PRINT
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