International studio — 36.1908/​1909(1909)

Page: LXI
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/international_studio36/0242
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"HERE THE MOTIF OF 'SIMPLE UNDECORATED SURFACES' IS ESTABLISHED BY THE STANDING WOODWORK"

true in form, line and color, to reaiize that the
suitabie only is beautifui, wiil make largely for the
better understanding which shouid exist between
architect and chent. It is the object of this de-
partment, each month, to lay before our readers
certain suggestions along the Mnes of interior
decoration and furnishing, which, if so desired,
may be embodied in the home of moderate cost.
To learn to abjure that which is artiAcial and false
wiM quickly bring an appreciation of the true and
beautifuk
Naturaf structural materials, wood, stone, brick
and cement, frankiy offered in undecorated sim-
pMcity, it wiil be reaHzed, are far more beautifuf
than the artihcial effects of veneered surfaces,
apphed pfaster scroMs and turned and highly var-
nished griHs of wood. Many of the less expensive
woods which are used for the interior Mnish of
houses are susceptible of very beautiful effects
when stained in naturai tones and given a duM
surface. Cypress, ash, chestnut, white and yel-
iow pine, popiar and whitewood may, any of these,
be successfuMv used. Of iate years we have

awakened, largely through the inHuence of the
Japanese, to the beauty of the grain of even the
commonest woods. Much of the exquisitely toned
work of these remarkabie peopie is in soft woods.
Great care should be taken in the selection of the
wood used for the interior of the cheapest house,
and aH detaif shouid be perfectty piain, thus giving
a distinction not to be obtained in any other way
in work of moderate cost.
It is frequentfy considered the best plan to
leave the side waHs of the house uncovered for the
Mrst year. Often the soft gray of the undecorated
plaster wiH be found pleasing, but there are con-
ditions which arise making some treatment of the
waMs a necessity. The Anish recommended may be
either a water-color wash or two coats of oil paint
so applied as to insure a duM surface. TheMrst
coat wiM be much less if the water-color wash is
used, and this is a temptation, but the lasting
qualities and washable surface afforded by the oil
paint results in its paying for itself. Beautiful
color effects may be secured through either me-
dium.

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