International studio — 36.1908/​1909(1909)

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n HE WINTER EXHIBITION OF
THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF
: DESIGN
JL BYARTHUR HOEBER
THERE are unmistakable signs of a new iease of
iife for the old Nationai Academy of Design in its
recent efforts to revive interest in the organization.
Since the advent of Mr. Harrison Morris on the
board things have happened, progress has been
made and pubiic attention has been unquestionabiy
directed toward its course, with the resuit that the
attendance has been increased, the saies have been
greater and generaiiy there are signs of health and
progress. For this winter dispiay, and for the first
time in the history of the Academy, arrangements
were made that enabled the scuiptors to have an
equai opportunity with the painters, and to that
end, through the courtesy of Mr. Frank Jay Gouid,
the spacious riding cirde beionging to that gentie-
man, next door to the building of the Fine Arts
Society, in West Fifty-seventh Street, was secured,
wherein was housed the scuipturai works under a
fine iighting, with reasona.bie possibiiities of spacing
and perspective. Under the management of the
Nationai Scuipture Society this part of the show
was made to take on a dignity and an interest so un-
usuai that it aimost became a case of the taii wag-
ging the dog, for the pictures neariy took on a sec-
o ndary part in the performance.
Many important groups were secured, notabiy
Lorado Taft's 2'Ae that impressive com-
position of pathetic figures, severai monumentai
g roups of soldiers and of aiiegoricai hgures for pub-
lic buiidings, and, from the doyen of the scuiptors,
John Q. A. Ward, to the youngest worker, there
were a fine iot of contributions refiecting credit on
the scuiptors. A prize was awarded to Robert I.
Aitkin for his charming little bronze group, T'/?e
FTafM&s, with its two iovers clasped in each other's
arms, powerfuliy rendered and impressive in the
reaiism of the passion and intensity of feeiing, and
there were some of the awwMffer.y with medaiists
and workers in ceramics, Mr. Roth having a dispiay
of the iatter in deiicate colors and attractive forms.
Prominent among the contributors were Daniei C.
French, with his impressive Ffc/ory, of
the Meivin Memoriai; Augustus Lukeman, with a
soidier and angel for Somcrviiie, Mass.; John J.
Boyie, with a iarge bas-reiief of ReAccca <z% IFcM,*
Paul W. Bartiett and Herbert Adams, not to men-
tion Isidore Konti's fountain group, and many
others of the younger men, scarceiy iess entertain-
ing.


GROUP FOR BY H. AUGUSTUS
SOLDIERS' MONUMENT LUKEMAN
SOMERVILLE, MASS.

A iarge canvas by Henry B. Fuiier, 7'Ae
o/ Ovcr Error, obtained the Carnegie prize
among the pictures, and occupied a considerabie
space at one end of the Vanderbiit gaiiery. The
work is known through reproductions pubiished
under the auspices of the Christian Science Church,
but, it must be confessed, it was more academic and
imposing than genuineiy artistic. John S. Sar-
gent's three portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Puiitzer and
Miss Brice were dazziing, fairiy, in their cleverness,
performances that no one save Sargent couid, per-
haps, have evolved, and there were the usuai con-
tributions from the remembered men and women
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