International studio — 34.1908

Page: CXIII
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/international_studio34/0477
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0.5
1 cm
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In the Galleries

N THE GALLERIES
BY HAROLD BENTLEY
The exhibition of The Ten American Paint-
ers at the Montross Gallery, Fifth Avenue and
Thirty-fifth Street, filled that place during the entire
time of the display, and, indeed, it was a matter of
considerable difficulty for the visitor to reach at all
the modest-sized rooms in the afternoon because
of the crowd, and, mirabile dictu, there were many
sales as well.
A collection of pictures by Mathilda Browne
follows the show of the work of Messrs. Carlson
and Macrum, at the gallery of Georges A. Glaenzer,
No. 33 East Twen-
tieth Street. Miss
Browne has ma-
tured in her work,
and of recent years
has turned her at-
tention to the
painting of cattle,
rendering her ani-
mals with author-
ity and an obvious
knowledge of anat-
omy and con-
struction, obtain-
ing meanwhile
capital color.
“From Copley
to Whistler” was
the title given to
the show of work
by American
painters held at
the Macbeth Gal-
leries, No. 450
Fifth Avenue, one
of the interesting
displays of the sea-
son, all of the men
represented hav-
ing passed away.
There were some
notable historical
portraits, three
Presidents of the
United States
being included,
George Washing-
ton, Martin Van

Buren and John Tyler. The first was by John
Trumbull, the second by S. A. Mount and the
third, which we reproduce, of John Tyler, by
Thomas Sully. A dignified work this last, with
a glimpse of the Capitol at Washington in the
background. The chief executive is seen three-
quarter face, with prominent nose, hair some-
what thin and an old-fashioned collar and black
stock. It is unmistakably a likeness and very
human, as well as representing Sully at his very
best. There were three works by George Fuller,
an equal number by William M. Hunt, and by
Copley three portraits. Jonathan Blackburn also
had a portrait, and there was work by Thomas
Cole, some of his sketches for the Voyage of Life.


Courtesy 0/ Macbeth Gallery
PORTRAIT OF PRESIDENT TYLER BY THOMAS SULLY

CXIII
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