International studio — 34.1908

Page: CXXII
DOI issue: DOI article: DOI article: DOI Page: Citation link: 
https://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglit/international_studio34/0486
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Swedish Hand-Carved Toys

Charles E. Heil, Needham, Mass.; J. Wesley Little,
Picture Rocks, Pa., and Herbert Paus, Bellingham,
Washington.
Wash Drawings: First Prize, $500, H. C. Wall,
1607 Broome Street, Wilmington, Del.; Second
Prize, $150, Fleetwood Church, 3530 Indiana
Avenue, Chicago, Ill.; Third Prize, $100, Roy
Martell Mason, Batavia, N. Y. Honorary Mention :
Arthur E. Jameson, Summit, N. J.; Harold M.
Brett, Wilmington, Del.; Harley D. Nichols, New
York, Mildred C. Green, Buffalo, N. Y., and C. H.
B. Morse, Newton Centre, Mass.

s

WEDISH HAND-CARVED TOYS
BY EVA LOVETT

At a recent fair held in Brooklyn,
N. Y., for the benefit of the Swedish
Hospital, interesting Swedish articles were sold.
Not the least attractive of these was a unique collec-
tion of toys and other trifles imported for the fair
by Mrs. Anna Ernberg, of Brooklyn, a woman
whose remarkable Swedish weavings have lately
been on exhibition at the rooms of the National
Society of Craftsmen, Nineteenth Street, New York,
and who has recently started a school of Swedish
tapestry weaving in Brooklyn.
The toys were those in common use in Sweden,
hand-carved, and either peasant-made or cut in
the sloyd and technical schools of the country.
These schools are partly supported by the govern-
ment, and among other hand-crafts taught is
wood-carving. Among the toys were hand-carved
reproductions, in miniature, of furniture used in the
homes of the humbler people. There were beds,
chairs, tables, chests of drawers, sofas and stools,
as well as dolls, candlesticks, vases, inkstands,
paper-knives, and other small articles. There was
an immense variety of boxes for all purposes, lunch


second prize
WATER COLOR

BY GUERNSEY
MOORE

boxes, work boxes, and boxes to hold everything
used in the household.
Some curious objects called beaters, or “skatte, ”
are used to beat out flax for the use of the spinner.
These have handles elaborately carved, and are
smoothed with the knife and decorated with Swe-
dish mottoes, and with pictures of flowers, hearts,
ribbons and tiny borders. That pictured was
used in one family for over one hundred years.
They are often carved and presented as a love gift.


SWEDISH SKATTE

BROOKLYN EXHIBITION

CXXII
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